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36th Annual
AAAS FORUM ON SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY
May 5-6, 2011
Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center
Washington, DC
 
PROGRAM
 
Thursday, May 5
7:45 a.m. Registration Opens
 
8:30 Welcome
Nina V. Fedoroff, Evan Pugh Professor, Huck Institute of the Life Sciences, Pennsylvania State University; Distinguished Visiting Professor, King Abdullah University for Science and Technology; and President, AAAS
 
8:40 BUDGETARY AND POLICY CONTEXT FOR R&D IN FY 2012 (Plenary Session)
Moderator: Nina V. Fedoroff, Evan Pugh Professor, Huck Institute of the Life Sciences, Pennsylvania State University; Distinguished Visiting Professor, King Abdullah University for Science and Technology; and President, AAAS
 
Keynote Address: John P. Holdren, Assistant to the President for Science and Technology; and Director, White House Office of Science and Technology Policy
 
• AAAS Overview of R&D in the FY 2012 Proposed Budget
Patrick J. Clemins, Director, R&D Budget and Policy Program, AAAS
 
• A View on Research and Innovation Issues from Congress
David Marc Pomerantz, Minority Staff Director, Committee on Appropriations, U.S. House of Representatives
 
• Demographic Patterns Driving Public Policy Decisions
Robert M. Groves, Director, U.S. Census Bureau
 
• The Global Economic/Political Picture
Catherine L. Mann, Barbara and Richard M. Rosenberg Professor of Global Finance, International Business School, Brandeis University
 
12:15 p.m. Luncheon
Presiding: Alan I. Leshner, Chief Executive Officer, AAAS, and Executive Publisher, Science
 
Address: Subra Suresh, Director, National Science Foundation
 
2:00 MAJOR ISSUES IN SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY (Concurrent Sessions)
 
(A) Communicating Science for Policy
• Why should scientists be concerned? • Scientists’ communication styles and how different audiences react to them • Being your own translator: adjusting your message for intended audiences • Tools and resources
 
Moderator: Rick Borchelt, Special Assistant for Public Affairs, Office of the Director, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health
 
Cornelia Dean, Science Writer and Former Editor, Science Section, The New York Times; author of Am I Making Myself Clear? A Scientist's Guide to Talking to the Public
 
Nancy Baron, Director of Science Outreach, Communication Partnership for Science and the Sea (COMPASS); author of Escape From the Ivory Tower: A Guide to Making Your Science Matter
 
Scott Doney, Senior Scientist, Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
 
Dennis Meredith, Independent Science Writer; Consultant on Research Communications; author of Explaining Research: How to Reach Key Audiences to Advance Your Work
 
(B) Emerging Issues in Scientific Integrity: Institutional and Personal Perspectives
• The Administration’s principles regarding scientific integrity in government • Implementation by federal agencies • Responsibilities of agencies and officials • Responsibilities of individual scientists • Universal principles of research integrity for all scientists, regardless of their institutional setting
 
Moderator: David Goldston, Director of Government Affairs, Natural Resources Defense Council; and member, AAAS Committee on Science, Engineering and Public Policy
 
Francesca Grifo, Senior Scientist and Director, Scientific Integrity Program, Union of Concerned Scientists
 
Alan D. Thornhill, Science Advisor to the Director, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, U.S. Department of the Interior
 
George Gray, Professor of Environmental and Occupational Health; and Director, Center for Risk Science and Public Health, George Washington University; and former Assistant Administrator, Office of Research and Development, Environmental Protection Agency
 
Felicity Barringer, National Environmental Correspondent, The New York Times
 
(C) The Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill: Scientific and Policy Perspectives
Just over a year ago, the nation experienced its largest oil spill. Many of the investigations have been completed, and plans for restoring the Gulf’s ecosystem have begun. • What have we learned, and what else do we need to learn? • Are the scientific questions about how to respond to a large oil spill better understood now than a year ago? • How is science contributing to the clean-up and recovery efforts? • What are the appropriate procedures for review and release of scientific information during a crisis?
 
Moderator: Terry D. Garcia, Executive Vice President for Mission Programs, National Geographic Society
 
Policy and Administrative Issues in Doing Science in Emergency Situations
Christopher D’Elia, Professor and Dean, School of the Coast and Environment,Louisiana State University
 
The Oil Spill’s Effects on Human Health: What We Know and Need to Know
Bernard D. Goldstein, Professor of Environmental and Occupational Health, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh
 
What’s Needed for the Future in Policy and in Science: An Agency Perspective
David Westerholm, Director, Office of Response and Restoration, National Ocean Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce
 
What’s Needed for the Future in Policy and in Science: A Congressional Perspective
Michal Freedhoff, Policy Director, Office of Representative Edward J. Markey
 
5:00 Coffee Break
 
5:30 The William D. Carey Lecture (public invited)
Presiding: Alan I. Leshner, Chief Executive Officer, AAAS, and Executive Publisher, Science
 
Address: U.S. Competitiveness in the 21st Century: Why an Eternal Optimist is Worried
Charles M. Vest, President, National Academy of Engineering 6:30 Reception
 
 
Friday, May 6

7:45 a.m. Breakfast
Presiding: Nina V. Fedoroff, Evan Pugh Professor, Huck Institute of the Life Sciences, Pennsylvania State University; Distinguished Visiting Professor, King Abdullah University for Science and Technology; and President, AAAS
 
Address: Anthony S. Fauci, Director, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health
 
9:00 NATIONAL INNOVATION STRATEGIES: A ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION OF CRITICAL QUESTIONS (Plenary Session)
• What should be the elements of a U.S. innovation strategy? How explicit should they be? • Other nations’ strategies for research and innovation – what can the U.S. learn from them? • How, and to what extent, can national policies help foster the kinds of skills and capacities needed for the 21st century economy?
 
Moderator: Yolanda Comedy, Independent Consultant; and Chair, AAAS Committee on Science, Engineering and Public Policy
 
Science and Innovation-Based Trends in the U.S.
Richard A. Bendis, President and CEO, Innovation America; and editor, Innovation Daily
 
A Comparison of the National Innovation Strategies of Key Nations
Robert D. Atkinson, President, Information Technology and Innovation Foundation
 
Panelists for Roundtable Discussion:
Debra M. Amidon, Founder and CEO, ENTOVATION International Ltd.
Robert D. Atkinson, President, Information Technology and Innovation Foundation
Richard A. Bendis, President and CEO, Innovation America; and editor, Innovation Daily
David Hart, Professor, School of Public Policy; and Director, Center for Science and Technology Policy, George Mason University
Michael Mandel, Senior Fellow, Mack Center for Technological Innovation, Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania
 
12:00 p.m. Luncheon
Presiding: Edward G. Derrick, Acting Director, Science and Policy Programs, AAAS
 
Address: Gregory B. Jaczko, Chairman, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission
 
1:45 U.S. RESEARCH UNIVERSITIES: HOW MANY DO WE NEED? HOW MANY CAN WE AFFORD? (Plenary Session)
 • Research universities: Their health and prospects • How sustainable are current trends? • The distinctive challenges for public and private research universities • Making do with less • The role of government
 
Moderator: Albert H. Teich, Senior Policy Advisor, AAAS
 
Tobin Smith, Vice President for Policy, Association of American Universities
 
Debra Stewart, President, Council of Graduate Schools
 
Irwin Feller, Professor Emeritus of Economics, Pennsylvania State University
 
3:30 Adjournment