Wednesday September 19, 2012
7:00AM - 8:00AM Registration and Continental Breakfast -
8:00AM - 9:30AM Opening Keynote - Major General Gary S. Patton, Director SAPRO, Major General Sharon Dunbar, United States Air Force; Ms. Mary Lou Leary, U.S. Attorney Jim Letten
9:30AM - 9:45AM BREAK -
9:45AM - 11:15AM "Flesh The Movie" - Screening Room
9:45AM - 11:15AM Assessing and Addressing Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking in a Local Context -
Kendra Penry
9:45AM - 11:15AM Assessment of Domestic Violence Cases Supporting Offender Accountability, Victim Safety, and Effective Response -
Karen Neill, Ph.D., R.N., SANE-A
9:45AM - 11:15AM Preparing Children for the Legal Process in Sexual Assault and Family Violence Cases: Strategies for Success -
Roger Canaff
9:45AM - 11:15AM Protecting Elder Abuse Victims: Building the Case, Buiding the Team -
Arlene Markarian
9:45AM - 11:15AM Recognizing and Responding to the Trauma Responses of Victims of Crime with Substance Use Issues -
Linda Douglas, M.ED., LADC
9:45AM - 11:15AM SAFE Start: Building Partnerships to Address Service Disparities for Victims with Developmental Disabilities -
Kira Laffe, Miriam Siddiq, Bobra Fyne
9:45AM - 11:15AM Transgender Survivors: Statistics, Stories, Strategies -
Michael Munson, Loree Cook-Daniels
9:45AM - 11:15AM Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services -
Joye E. Frost
11:15AM - 12:15PM
Afternoon Plenary - The Rising Tide of Elder Financial Explotation"
The Hon. Hubert Humphry, III
12:15PM - 1:15PM Luncheon -
1:30PM - 3:00PM Domestic Sex Trafficking: The Chicago Approach (A Multidisciplinary Approach to Services and Prosecution) -
Lou Longhitano, Jennifer Greene
1:30PM - 3:00PM Healing the Hurt: Parenting the Sexually Abused Child -
Shannon Cossaboom
1:30PM - 3:00PM Incorporating Victim Voices into Research: Examples from the Field -
Seri Irazola, Ph.D., Erin Williamson, Bethany L. Backes, Sara Debus-Sherrill, M.A., Emily Niedzwiecki
1:30PM - 3:00PM Oklahoma’s State-Tribal Crime Victim Liaison Initiative -
Brian Hendrix
1:30PM - 3:00PM Police Response to People with Disabilities (An 8 Part Series) - Screening Room
1:30PM - 3:00PM Responding to Victim Witness Intimidation: Milwaukee's Approach -
Kara Schurman, Branko Stojsavljevic
1:30PM - 3:00PM Collaborating and Training Across the Spectrum: To Effectively Respond to Crimes Committed Against Persons with Disabilities Using a Multidisciplinary Approach -
Nancy A. Alterio, Marilyn Hammond Ph.D.
1:30PM - 3:00PM Team Work=Success; Collaborating to Save Inner-City High Crime Areas -
Darlene Averick, SA Michael Eberhardt, Senior Investigator Rosa Donini
1:30PM - 3:00PM Using Social Influence to Combat Investment Fraud -
Christine Kieffer
3:00PM - 3:15PM BREAK -
3:15PM - 4:45PM "FagBug" - Screening Room
3:15PM - 4:45PM DNA in Human Trafficking -
Jose Antonio Lorente, Arthur Jay Eisenberg
3:15PM - 4:45PM Ethical Legal Advocacy-Issues for Domestic Violence Advocates -
Jessica Dayton, Erin Scott
3:15PM - 4:45PM Responding to American Indian/Alaskan Native Crime Victims with Disabilities: What You Need to Know -
Gayle Thom, Stanley L. Pryor
3:15PM - 4:45PM Challenging Perceptions: Military Responses to Domestic and Sexual Violence -
Heather Fiedler
3:15PM - 4:45PM Right to a Separate & Secure Waiting Area in Courthouses: Unfulfilled Promise to Reality -
Janet E. Fine, M.S., Christopher Klaskin, M.S.
3:15PM - 4:45PM Dating Violence: Advocating for Teen Survivors -
Morgan Lynn
3:15PM - 4:45PM
Giving Victims of CyberCrime a VOICE: Resources Available for Victim Advocates and Law Enforcement-
Kathryn Malbon Rinker, Kimberly Williams
3:15PM - 4:45PM Unidisciplinary to Transdisciplinary Response to Elder Victimization -
Kirk Kimberly, Patrick Stickel
4:45PM - 6:00PM Poster Sessions - Exhibit Hall
 
Thursday September 20, 2012
7:00AM - 8:00AM Continental Breakfast -
8:00AM - 9:00 AM Morning Keynote -"Picking Up the Pieces Without Picking Up"
Jennifer Storm
9:00 AM - 9:15 AM BREAK -
9:15AM - 10:45AM "Saving Our Parents" - Screening Room
9:15AM - 10:45AM Community Policing and Drug Endangered Children -
Jade Woodard, Nazmia Alqadi, Karne Goldsberry
9:15AM - 10:45AM Domestic Violence Court Partnership: Developing Systems to Meet Survivors Needs -
Ann Cofell, Patty Hackett, Judge Kris Davick-Halfen, Janelle Kendall
9:15AM - 10:45AM Immigration Relief for Foreign Victims -
Ashley Garrett, Scott Whelan
9:15AM - 10:45AM Office for Older Americans-Protecting Seniors from Financial Explotation -
Jenefer Duane, Naomi Karp
9:15AM - 10:45AM Reducing Victimization for Individuals with Disabilities, Behavior and Communication -
Scott Modell, Ph.D.
9:15AM - 10:45AM The Role of Child Abuse Pediatricians in Cases of Child Abuse and Neglect -
Allison Jackson, M.D., M.P.H., F.A.A.P.
9:00AM - 10:30AM Legislative Updates for the 112th Congress -
Susan Howley
9:15AM - 10:45AM When Communities are Victimized: Strategies for Addressing Trauma and Building Resilience -
Elaine Zook Barge, Nathan C. Barge
10:45 AM - 11:00 AM
Break
11:00 AM - 12:30 PM "Lost Sparrow" - Screening Room
11:00 AM - 12:30 PM Healing the Warrior Within: An Exploration of Yoga, Breath-Work, and Meditation -
Carly Sachs
11:00 AM - 12:30 PM Implementing an Agenda for Crime Victims with Disabilities (Part 1 of 2 Part Session) -
Nora Baladerian, Ph.D, Nancy A. Alterio, Paul B. Feuerstein, Roberta Sick Facilitator: Tom Coleman
11:00 AM - 12:30 PM Lessons from Penn State -
Victor Vieth
11:00 AM - 12:30 PM Navigating the Criminal Justice System Within a Support Group Setting -
Emmy Ritter, Crystal Tenty
11:00 AM - 12:30 PM Providing Collaborative Services for Abuse in Later Life Survivors -
Ann Turner
11:00 AM - 12:30 PM Screening: Determining the Survivor and Abuser in LGBQ/T Relationships Where There is Domestic Violence (Part 1 of 2 Part Session) -
Tre'Andre Valentine, Shakira Cruz Román
11:00 AM - 12:30 PM Media Training: Developing the Message -
Anne Nicholas
11:00 AM - 12:30 PM The Colorado Project to Comprehensively Combat Human Trafficking -
AnnJanette Alejano-Steele, Ph.D., Lindsey Breslin, MSSW
12:30 PM - 1:30 PM Lunch on your Own
1:45 PM- 3:15 PM "Concrete Steel & Paint" - Screening Room
1:45 PM- 3:15 PM Bounce! Facilitating Resilience in Victimized Youth -
Whitney Maynor, Ph.D., Amy Vigliotti, Ph.D.
1:45 PM- 3:15 PM Healing the Warrior Within: An Exploration of Yoga, Breath-Work, and Meditation -
Carly Sachs
1:45 PM- 3:15 PM Implementing an Agenda for Crime Victims with Disabilities (Part 2 of 2 Part Session) -
Nora Baladerian, Ph.D, Nancy A. Alterio, Paul B. Feuerstein, Roberta Sick, Facilitator: Tom Coleman
1:45 PM- 3:15 PM Crime Victims and Forensic Science: Implications for Crime Victims' Rights and Services -
Steve Seigel, Mitch Morrissey
1:45 PM- 3:15 PM Promising Partnership Practices Between Law Enforcement and Immigrant Victims of Crime -
Pradine Saint Fort, Leslye Orloff, Anthony Flores
1:45 PM- 3:15 PM Screening: Determining the Survivor and Abuser in LGBQ/T Relationships Where There is Domestic Violence (Part 2 of 2 Part Session) -
Tre'Andre Valentine, Shakira Cruz Román
1:45 PM- 3:15 PM The NISVS Stalking Data: Implications for the Field -
Jessamyn Tracy, Michelle Garcia
1:45 PM- 3:15 PM The Power of Partnerships: Utilizing a Collaborative Response to Meet the Needs of Older Victims of Abuse -
Risa Breckman, LCSW, Veronica LoFaso, MD
3:15 PM - 3:30 PM Break
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM Afternoon Plenary "Stalking, Murder and Civil Remedies for Ineffective Home Security Systems- The ADT Story"- Bill Harper, Paul Peterson, Vicki Swenson
 
Friday September 21, 2012
7:00AM - 8:00AM Continental Breakfast -
8:00AM - 8:45AM Morning Plenary- "Left Behind: Finding Meaning and Forgiveness After a Loved One's Violent Death" - Donna Britt
8:45AM - 9:00AM BREAK -
9:00AM - 10:30AM "Boys and Men Healing" - Screening Room
9:00AM - 10:30AM An Innovative Youth Violence Prevention and Intervention Program: Overview, Curriculum, and Evaluation -
Jessica Mischkot, Lola Martin
9:00AM - 10:30AM Bridging the Gap A collaboration Among Victims, Victim Advocates and Reentry Specialists -
Elizabeth Gaynes, Marie Verzuli, Kathy Boudin, Moderator: Susan Herman
9:00AM - 10:30AM Financial Explotation of the Elderly -
Elizabeth Loewy, Risa Breckman LCSW
9:00AM - 10:30AM Increasing Offender Accountability and Victims Safety in Stalking Cases -
Mark Kurkowski, Jennifer Landhuis
9:00AM - 10:30AM Reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act: The Plan and our Progress -
Susan Howley, Rosie Hidalgo
9:00AM - 10:30AM Managing Organizations to Promote Resiliency -
Karen Kalergis, Debra K. Anderson, Veronica Neuhoff, Noel Busch-Armendariz
9:00AM - 10:30AM Responding to Foreign Child Victims of Human Trafficking -
Kathryn Naomi Taylor
9:00AM - 10:30AM The Misunderstood Victim: Assisting Those with an Acquired Brain Injury -
Nils Rosenbaum M.D., Matthew Tinney
10:30AM - 10:45AM BREAK -
10:45AM - 12:15PM "The Invisible War" - Screening Room
10:45AM - 12:15PM Elder Abuse: Common, Lethal and Expensive -
Kathleen Quinn
10:45AM - 12:15PM Advocating for Immigrant Victims at Risk of Removal -
Sonia Parras Konrad
10:45AM - 12:15PM Bridging Barriers into Indian Country -
Geri Wisner-Foley, Judge Saunie Wilson
10:45AM - 12:15PM Ensuring Program Access and Physical Accessibility in Courthouses for Victims of Crime with Disabilities -
Jason Johnson, Vickie Simpson
10:45AM - 12:15PM Strategic Fundraising -- Models that Work -
Beth Grupp
10:45AM - 12:15PM How and Why to Protect Young Athletes from Sexual Abuse, Bullying, and Harassment -
Katherine Starr
10:45AM - 12:15PM Sharing Space: Officer/Advocate Strategies for Supporting Victims in High Risk Domestic Violence Situations -
Crystal Tently, Tami Shafer
10:45AM - 12:15PM More DNA Testing,  with Less Taxpayer Funding -
Chris Asplen



Workshop Descriptions
 
Media Training

Anne Nicholas

How do you develop messages that will resonate with the media?  Once you have developed the message, how do you most effectively communicate to reach your targeted audiences?

This session will focus on developing effective communications that get the word out about your news, projects and events. A discussion about what reporters look for in a good news story, as well as tips for working with the media are some of the highlights of this interactive session.

 

 

Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services

Joye E. Frost

This workshop will provide a first look at the results of "Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services," the broad-based initiative supported by the Office for Victims of Crime, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice in partnership with the field.  This two-year effort aimed to expand the vision and impact of the crime victim services field.  Through input from hundreds of stakeholders and a review of relevant data and research, the initiative examined the current status of crime victim services, focusing on the role of the victim services field, enduring and emerging challenges, and capacity building.  Some of the preliminary findings include proposed policy changes,  the need not just for more funding but more flexibility in how funding is used, the challenges – and opportunities – of serving victims in the digital age, and forging a future that is guided by victims’ needs and informed by research.  The results provide an opportunity for real change in the role of victim services in the Nation’s overall efforts to ensure the safety and well-being of communities.



Preparing Children for the Legal Process in Sexual Assault and Family Violence Cases: Strategies for Success

Roger Canaff

This presentation will explore the challenges faced by multi-disciplinary teams (MDTs) in child abuse and family violence legal cases involving children as victims and witnesses. It will also provide strategies and suggestions for MDTs to help children participate in the legal process without being revictimized by it.  The workshop will emphasize the paramount importance of the welfare of the child victim or witness in  any legal process. It will also stress that with preparation, skill, compassion, and patience, children can be their own best legal advocates, and the interests of the child and that of the case can almost always be in harmony. Most importantly, participants will receive concrete, practical tips and strategies to help prepare children for the legal process, such as court tours to reduce anxiety, legal motions to ensure a “child-fair” trial process, and collaboration within the MDT to monitor and consistently protect children’s best interests and seek a favorable outcome for all involved.

 

Recognizing and Responding to the Trauma Responses of Victims of Crime with Substance Use Issues

Linda Douglas, M.ED., LADC

This workshop will provide information from the latest research about how trauma affects the brain and increases the desire of the victim to self-medicate with drugs and alcohol. It will also cover the long-term effects of trauma and substance abuse, as well as resiliency and other factors that influence a person’s ability to recover from trauma (i.e. attachment, cultural background, and support networks). The presenter will use a case study to illustrate how a trauma-informed approach can enhance interventions and advocacy, and participants will discuss how to use such an approach to lessen trauma responses and help facilitate change and recovery in victims of crime.

 

Protecting Elder Abuse Victims: Building the Case, Building the Team

Arlene Markarian

In Brooklyn N.Y., a collaboration among investigators, advocates, criminal and civil lawyers, and police has created a new level of effectiveness in protecting older adults, collecting evidence of elder abuse required for all courts—criminal, civil, guardianship, and mental hygiene—and holding abusers accountable. This workshop will provide  practical, proven tools for participants to  significantly upgrade their investigative, interviewing, and evidence-collection skills.  Presenters will also underscore  the extraordinary benefits of collaboration and include a case study and question and answer session.

 

 

Reducing Victimization for Individuals with Disabilities, Behavior and Communication

Scott Modell, Ph.D.

Research suggests that the characteristics of persons involved in a crime (such as the presence of a disability in the victim) can influence police officers’ perceptions about and responses to the crime.    Other research suggests that social service personnel, too, have significantly varied perceptions of individuals with disabilities. These perceptions and response tendencies may result in part from difficulties in understanding the complex context of human behavior in persons with disabilities and how to respond appropriately to the varied communication capacities of such individuals. This presentation will focus on understanding such challenges, and how to communicate effectively with individuals with autism, intellectual disability and speech/language disorder. It will also explore how an improved understanding of these issues can help reduce victimization of persons with disabilities.

 

Transgender Survivors: Statistics, Stories, Strategies

Michael Munson, Loree Cook-Daniels

This interactive and fast-paced workshop will encourage participants to expand their vocabulary and conceptual framework(s) about transgender people, specifically in regard to sexual assault, domestic violence, and hate violence crimes against this population. Attendees will increase their ability to fluidly and respectfully interact with and serve transgender survivors and their loved ones. Topics will include prevalence rates, barriers to accessing services, and unique issues facing transgender survivors and the service providers who work with them.  Participants will learn practical steps to help them modify existing policies and procedures, identify and lower barriers to service, and improve effective services to transgender survivors and loved ones.

 

Assessment of Domestic Violence Cases Supporting Offender Accountability, Victim Safety, and Effective Response

Karen Neill, Ph.D., R.N., SANE-A

This workshop will explore strategies for connecting health, human, and social systems to create an  effective response to domestic violence. It will also  include a presentation of current evidence on the use of evidence in risk assessments for domestic violence cases. The case presentation will give  participants an opportunity to explore how to apply the case evaluation process, which is critical to facilitating efforts to hold the offender accountable and protect victim safety. Presenters will stress the need for interprofessional sharing of expertise in an atmosphere of respect and trust. The  closing discussion will focus on promising practices to enhance outcomes in responding to domestic violence.

 

Promising Practices in Partnerships Between Law Enforcement and Immigrant Victims of Crime

Pradine Saint-Fort

Leslye Orloff, Anthony Flores

Law enforcement and victim advocates have the difficult and important challenge of gaining the trust of victims of violent crimes, including domestic violence, assault, and human trafficking. When the victims are immigrants, the professionals face additional barriers to earning victims’ trust and helping them seek justice. Law enforcement agencies across the country have developed programs and practices to combat these barriers and better serve these victims and their communities. The most effective approaches, which have been developed in collaboration with advocates, include  the “U” non-immigrant visa for immigrant crime victims, which helps police to increase crime reporting by immigrants and work successfully with advocates. This workshop will explore the barriers to justice experienced by immigrant crime victims and case examples of programs and partnerships that are effectively overcoming barriers between police and immigrant victims of crime.

 

Healing the Hurt: Parenting the Sexually Abused Child

Shannon Cossaboom

This session provides an overview of sexual abuse education that includes the continuum of sexual behaviors in children—from normal behaviors to behaviors of concern, as well as myths about offenders and keys to understanding the grooming process. It also highlights the journey of non-offending caregivers of the sexually abused child from the initial disclosure of abuse to recognizing resiliency in both the child and the family unit. The workshop will include practical tips for dealing with the child’s anger and helping the child feel safe again.

 

Bridging the Gap: A Collaboration Among Victims, Victim Advocates, and Reentry Specialists

Elizabeth Gaynes

Marie Verzuli, Kathy Boudin

Moderator: Susan Herman 

Collaborations among reentry organizations, victims, and victim advocates involve hard work, and can produce profound and innovative results. This workshop presents a case study of a collaboration between the Osborne Association (a nonprofit agency with an 80-year history of serving defendants, prisoners, and their families) and victims and victim advocates to produce “Coming to Terms,” a 16-week curriculum for incarcerated people who committed homicide-related offenses. The curriculum is currently used in Sing Sing and Fishkill Correctional Facilities, two New York State prisons. Panelists will discuss the history of the project, the process and experience of collaboration, the curriculum they produced, and the policy implications from their work together.

 

Incorporating Victim Voices into Research: Examples from the Field

Seri Irazola, PhD

Erin Williamson, Bethany L. Backes, Sara Debus-Sherrill, MA, Emily Niedzwiecki

Under a contract with the Department of Justice's National Institute of Justice (NIJ), ICF International, LLC. (ICF) conducted a national evaluation of statewide automated victim information and notification (SAVIN) programs and a study of victims’ experiences of wrongful convictions. Both these projects used  victim-centered methodologies to guide their data collection and inform their study findings. In addition to learning about the effectiveness of automated notification systems and the impact of wrongful conviction on crime victims, workshop participants will gain a comprehensive understanding of the processes, lessions learned, and recommendations for implementing victim-centered methodologies to enhance and strengthen the rights and services afforded to victims of crime.

 

Financial Explotation of the Elderly

Elizabeth Loewy

Risa Breckman, LCSW

The workshop will present a panel discussion on elder financial exploitation, widely regarded as the most prevalent type of elder abuse. All speakers will discuss their work and the types of cases they are seeing; they will then involve participants in a discussion about a case study (using a real case with names changed).  The panel will focus on how banks and law enforcement respond to the older financial abuse victims. They will also cover how to prevent, detect, and respond to elder financial abuse. The session will conclude with a question and answer session if time permits.

 

Domestic Sex Trafficking: The Chicago Approach (A Multidisciplinary Approach to Services and Prosecution)

Lou Longhitano

Jennifer Greene

This workshop will examine the multi-tiered system of sex trafficking that encompasses victims, pimps, and a higher-level, organized tier where disputes are resolved, boundaries are allocated, and general rules of business are enforced. It will outline a collaborative approach among local, state and federal law enforcement in covert investigations. It will also examine the key role of service providers in combating sex trafficking and the essential need for those providers to be involved in the law enforcement response from the beginning. Presenters will discuss the feasibility of duplicating this model in smaller jurisdictions, as well as best practices for implementation. Finally, they will introduce the 2010 Illinois Safe Children’s Act as an example of Safe Harbor legislation to protect victims of crime.

 

Responding to Victim Witness Intimidation: Milwaukee's Approach

Kara Schurman

Branko Stojsavljevic

Experts from the Milwaukee Police Department will discuss the dynamics of victim-witness intimidation and highlight promising approaches and case examples of the problem. We will review "traditional" responses to domestic violence and sexual assault cases and what those historical responses have taught us. This workshop highlights a new way of looking at victim-witness intimidation in responding to domestic violence and sexual assault cases.

 

 

Team Work=Success: Collaborating to Save Inner-city, High-crime Areas

Darlene Averick

Michael Eberhardt, Rosa Donini

The workshop will introduce attendees to the influences involved in crime victim and witness intimidation. Presenters will emphasize the high level of coercion and terrorizing of victims and witnesses in American inner-city, high crime areas. The workshop will cover: 

·        Investigative techniques useful in soliciting cooperation;

·        Techniques to create postive, long-term results within American high-crime, inner-city communities;

·        How to develop good, working relationships and trust with law enforcement partners;

·        How to locate and use local resources to best serve case victims and witnesses.  

     

Right to a Separate and Secure Waiting Area in Courthouses: From Unfulfilled Promise to Reality

Janet Fine, M.S.

Christopher Klaskin, M.S.

Since the enactment of original victim rights laws in the 1980s, victims and witnesses have generally been entitled to the “right to a separate and secure waiting area” in courthouses to protect them from threats, intimidation, and assaults. Like many other states with laws ensuring this right, Massachusetts failed to implement these waiting areas for several reasons, including the nottion that this right was typically “subject to appropriation and available resources.” After years of legislative advocacy, Massachusetts victim advocates succeeded in amending our state’s victims’ rights law to address this serious concern.  This workshop will provide an in-depth review and analysis of the legislative path to success and the effective steps taken to implement this right in courthouses across the entire state.  The presentation and discussion will consider ways in which this large-scale initiative may be replicable and adaptable in other states to ensure enforcement of this essential right.

Domestic Violence Court Partnership: Developing Systems to Meet Survivors’ Needs

Ann Cofell

Maxine Barnett, Judge Kris Davick-Halfen, Janelle Kendall

The Stearns County Domestic Violence Court Project is a sytem-wide partnership that brings prosecutors, Legal Aid attorneys, domestic violence advocates, judges, law enforcement, and others together to ensure that when an abuser is arrested for a felony-level act of domestic violence, the victim can immediately access intensive services, including a full-range of legal services, and the abuser is held accountable for his actions—from the arrest, through prosecution and after release from prison or jail. This workshop will describe the creation of the project, the impact of the project on offenders and survivors, and strategies that have implications for services to victims. The workshop will include a panel discussion that will describe the impact and importance of the broad-based partnership strategy to address domestic violence.

 

Unidisciplinary To Transdisciplinary: Response to Elder Victimization

Kirk Kimberly

Patrick Stickel

Improvement of Coordinated Community Responses (CCRs) are a top priority for many of us who work with the vulnerable adult population. Today’s presentation will focus on the VALOR (Vulnerable Adult Linked Organizational Response) project as a model for application of cross-disciplinary leadership concepts as a framework for developing a more robust CCR. VALOR has its origins in law enforcement, and inclusion of law enforcement as part of a CCR often presents unique challenges or barriers. The VALOR model demonstrates how law enforcement has been able to adapt and integrate successfully with other community resources, agencies, and organizations. In addition to analyzing the impact of VALOR, the presentation will explore VALOR’s evolution in terms of P. Rosenfield’s (1992) taxonomy of multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary, and transdisciplinary concepts in order to provide ideas on how to improve project efficiency and help with sustainability.

Responding to American Indian/Alaskan Native Crime Victims with Disabilities: What You Need to Know

Gayle Thom

Data clearly suggest that the percentage of Native Americans with disabilities is higher than that of any other racial group in the U.S. Furthermore,  crime statistics involving American Indians/Alaskan Natives indicate the need for professionals who are trained to provide services to this population in a culturally responsive manner. This interactive workshop covers what law enforcement, victim service professionals, allied practitioners, policymakers, researchers, and all multidisciplinary team members need to know about responding to American Indian and Alaskan Native victims in ways that respect and honor cultural and spiritual traditions rather than viewing those traditions as complexities. The workshop will enhance the knowledge, skills, and attitudes of service providers to serve victims with disabilities who experience crime, abuse, and neglect.

 

Ethical Legal Advocacy--Issues for Domestic Violence Advocates

Jessica Dayton

Erin Scott

Legal advocacy is a valuable service for victims of domestic violence.  This workshop will explore challenges most commonly encountered by domestic violence advocates working on legal issues, including what constitutes legal advice and the parameters of privilege.  We will also explore the challenges of attorney/client privilege as it pertains to multidisciplinary agencies—specifically when does attorney/client privilege or any other privilege  apply? We will use scenarios to highlight specific problems  and brainstorm solutions.  We will base our legal authority on the Model Code of Evidence and will reference specific state examples.

 

Office for Older Americans: Protecting Seniors from Financial Exploitation

Jenefer Duane

Naomi Karp

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), Office for the Financial Protection of Older Americans will present a panel discussion to provide  an overview of the Bureau and its responsibilities under the Dodd-Frank Consumer Protection Act for the Office for Older Americans, as well as an update on our progress towards this Congressional mandate. We will also invite discussion about  how the CFPB Office for Older Americans can “lead, serve and innovate” in collaboration with community partners and stakeholders.

 

Immigration Relief for Foreign Victims

Ashley Garrett

Scott Whelan

Under U.S. law, varied forms of immigration relief are available to foreign nationals who are victims of crime and who cooperate with law enforcement. Speakers from the Department of Homeland Security’s Citizenship and Immigration Services (CIS) and Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) will provide an overview of the various forms of immigration relief (including parole, continued presence, T-visa, U- visa, and VAWA) relief that are available to victims of crime. The presentation will include eligibility criteria and steps in applying for and processing these forms of relief.  The workshop will  clarify  the roles and responsibilities of law enforcement, immigration attorneys, and victim advocates in seeking relief on behalf of victims of crime.

 

SAFE Start: Building Partnerships to Address Service Disparities for Victims with Developmental Disabilities

Kira Laffe

Bobra Fyne, Miriam Siddiq

Recent media reports reflect what research has demonstrated for some time: individuals with developmental disabilities experience alarmingly high rates of sexual assault. Victims and their support networks need comprehensive services. This module will present the coordinated efforts of Project Shield and the New York City Alliance Against Sexual Assault (The Alliance) to build the capacity of trained Sexual Assault Forensic Examiners to provide competent, comprehensive care and treatment to survivors of sexual assault living with developmental disabilities. Participants will learn about the history and development of this partnership, as well as ideas for implementing this model in their own jurisdictions. This workshop aims to foster a strategic relationship among community agencies, program managers, victim advocates, and law enforcement to skillfully address the unique needs of this victim population.

 

When Communities are Victimized: Strategies for Addressing Trauma and Building Resilience

Elaine Zook Barge

Nathan C. Barge

Communities as well as individuals are impacted by disaster, disease, conflict, and violence. Trauma affects how we think, feel, and behave, and unhealed trauma often leads to more violence as victims and groups act out against others or become self-destructive. This workshop will describe the Strategies for Trauma Awareness and Resilience (STAR) model, a multidisciplinary approach for those working on the immediate and long-term effects of trauma in their communities. The model, which has been tested throughout the world during the last ten years, draws on the fields of trauma healing, restorative justice, conflict transformation, and spirituality for building resilient individuals and healthy communities.

 

The Colorado Project to Comprehensively Combat Human Trafficking

AnnJanette Alejano-Steele, Ph.D.

Lindsey Breslin, MSSW

The presentation will feature the Colorado Project to Comprehensively Combat Human Trafficking, a collaborative initiative that aims to develop sustainable means to end human trafficking (a severe form of labor and/or sexual exploitation of another human being and a form of theft and violence.) Efforts to combat human trafficking as a distinct crime are relatively new. The Colorado Project, a state-level initiative, has developed a tool communities can use to  assess their strengths and gaps in combating human trafficking. The project is organized around the “4 P’s:” prevention, protection, prosecution, and partnership. The research design also emphasizes (1) honoring community characteristics; and (2) engaging in critical thinking dialogues that include parallel issue groups (e.g., labor rights, sex worker rights, immigrant rights, homeless advocacy). Workshop participants will have the opportunity to begin assessing their communities’ anti-trafficking efforts.

 

Lessons from Penn State

Victor Vieth

This workshop will discuss the recent child sexual abuse scandal at Penn State University and point out that these events are not unique. Indeed, numerous studies over the past 20 years suggest that most professionals won't report even clear circumstances of abuse. The reason for the breakdown in the mandated reporting system will be discussed. More importantly, the speaker will offer concrete solutions for improving our mandated reporting system, as well as our overall response to allegations of maltreatment.

 

Providing Collaborative Services for Abuse in Later Life Survivors

Ann Turner

This workshop will provide information on how current practices, policies, and procedures of domestic violence programs can create barriers to service for later life survivors of abuse.  The presenter will use a series of short videos featuring the voices of survivors of abuse in later life and the voices of advocates throughout the country discussing their experience in providing specialized services to this population. Presenters will also discuss additional abuse-related legal advocacy issues in later life survivors, as well as the need for expanding collaborative partners when working with this population.

 

Navigating the Criminal Justice System Within a Support Group Setting

Emmy Ritter

Crystal Tenty

Navigating the criminal justice system (CJS)  is often difficult for survivors of domestic violence. Various emotional and practical issues arise for survivors, impacting their interest in participating in prosecution and interfering with the healing process. This workshop addresses ways to successfully support survivors of domestic violence within a peer-facilitated support group setting while their cases are being prosecuted. Discussion will focus on designing support group curriculua with an emphasis on the CJS and group facilitation successes and challenges.

 

Building an Agenda for Crime Victims with Disabilities

Nora Baladerian, Ph.D

Nancy A. Alterio, Paul B. Feuerstein, Roberta Sick 

Facilitator: Tom Coleman

This workshop will be a gathering of professionals whose work focuses on crime victims with disabilities.  Panel members and audience participants will share what they are doing for this population in their own communities and discuss what is next in ensuring equal rights within the criminal justice system. By providing the opportunity to support existing project, collaborate on existing or planned projects, and share both people and other types of resources, this gathering can serve as a force for consolidating and focusing the efforts of the relatively small cadre of advocates who work on this issue.  The program will begin with presentations by the panel members.

 

Healing the Warrior Within: An Exploration of Yoga, Breathwork, and Meditation

Carly Sachs

Yoga brings us back to the body, where many of our emotions, stresses, and traumas are stored. These stresses create fragmentation in body and mind. Yoga (“to yoke” in Sanskrit) teaches us to yoke body, breath, and mind, helping to cultivate the body’s natural rhythm of systems working together to create and restore a fully alive and integrated being. This workshop will focus on yoga poses and breathwork that have helped survivors of trauma reconnect to their bodies. The session will emphasize techniques that calm the parasympathetic nervous system, giving the practitioner a deeper sense of peace and stability.

 

Screening: Determining the Survivor and Abuser in LGBQ/T Relationships Where There is Domestic Violence, Part 1

Tre'Andre Valentine

Shakira Cruz Román

Screening can help any provider or law enforcement official distinguish between the survivor and the abuser in a relationship where domestic violence is happening. This skill is crucial in helping to ensure that lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer, and/or transgender individuals receive appropriate services, and that  the safety of survivors and providers is ensured. Participants will receive a copy of The Intimate Partner Abuse Screening Tool for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender (GLBT) Relationships, a project of the Boston Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Domestic Violence Coalition. This presentation will explore the difference between domestic violence in heterosexual, cisgender relationships and lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer and/or transgender relationships. Presenters will discuss the rationale for screening and will provide instructions to implement the tool. This presentation is a pre-requisite for Screening II.

 

Screening: Determining the Survivor and Abuser in LGBQ/T Relationships Where There is Domestic Violence Part II

Tre'Andre Valentine

Shakira Cruz Román

Screening can help any provider or law enforcement official distinguish between the survivor and the abuser in a relationship, and determine whether they are speaking to a survivor or abuser in a relationship where domestic violence is happening. This skill is crucial in helping to ensure that lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer, and/or transgender individuals receive appropriate services, and that the safety of survivors and providers is ensured. Participants will receive a copy of The Intimate Partner Abuse Screening Tool for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender (GLBT) Relationships, a project of the Boston Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Domestic Violence Coalition. This interactive workshop gives participants the opportunity to become comfortabily familiar with and practice the elements of screening presented in Screening I. Screening I is a pre-requisite for this workshop.

 

Advocating for Immigrant Victims at Risk of Removal

Sonia Parras Konrad, Rosie Hidalgo

This workshop will present an overview of the "Secure Communities" program and other current practices, programs, and policies to build collaborations between U. S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and local law enforcement  In addition, presenters will engage and work with participants on best practices and strategies to advocate for immigrant survivors of domestic and sexual violence in the current enforcement environment, and provide additional tools, safety planning, and resources to assist in advocacy efforts.

 

Bounce! Facilitating Resilience in Victimized Youth

Whitney Maynor, Ph.D.

Amy Vigliotti, Ph.D.

This workshop will review the current research on resilience and explain the design and successful outcome of our teen-led Bounce! Initiative. Bounce is a youth mentoring group of approximately  8–10 teens impacted by sexual violence. These teens draw on their traumatic experiences to respond with empathy in a culturally relevant manner to help other underserved, victimized teens. Teens thrive in our program, showing increased productivity, leadership skills, a deeper appreciation for loved ones, and a decrease in signs and symptoms consistent with PTSD. Our teens are continuously reminded through their own efforts and successesful functioning that although their trauma cannot be erased, they can learn how to manage their reactions to stress and apply adaptive coping skills.

 

The NISVS Stalking Data: Implications for the Field

Jessamyn Tracy

Michelle Garcia

The results from the National Intimate Partner Sexual Violence  survey (NISVS) are the most significant research on stalking since the release of the Bureau of Justice Statistics report, Stalking Victimization in the United States, in 2009. While some of the NISVS findings mirror the BJS report and myriad other studies on stalking, other NISVS results differ from those of other studies in important ways. This session will explore the important NISVS findings on stalking, how these results reconcile with previous stalking research, and implications for the field.

 

Legislative Update/Constitutional Ammendment Updates

Susan Howley

Legislative Updates for the 112th Congress

The National Center’s Public Policy Director will update participants on victim and criminal justice legislation currently pending in Congress, including the proposed Crime Victims' Rights Constitutional Amendment. She will also provide an overview and update on fiscal Year 2013 appropriations for crime victim programs, including VOCA and VAWA. 

 

Reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act: The Plan and our Progress

Susan Howley, Rosie Hidalgo
This workshop will walk participants through the pending legislation to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act.  Find out how the legislation was developed; how the bill will help to end sexual assault, stalking, domestic violence and dating violence; what changes are in store for grantees; the points of contention between the House and Senate versions of the bill; and how interested advocates can get involved.  
 

Managing Organizations to Promote Resiliency

Karen Kalergis

Debra K. Anderson, Veronica Neuhoff, Noel Busch-Armendariz

Research has shown that although organizations can be a source of stress for workers, there are strategies enlightened organizations can use to build resiliency and retain workers. This workshop provides results from a national pilot project and offers an overview of an organizational resiliency model that was developed for child abuse workers. The workshop will present concrete examples from the Children’s Advocacy Center (CAC) and a Court-Appointed Special Advocacy (CASA) program on what organizations can do to promote resiliency through policies, supervisory techniques, and training. In this interactive session, participants will have an opportunity to identify challenges to resiliency within their organizations and consider how to apply strategies from the pilot to address them. The workshop will provide resources to assess challenges to organizational resiliency and steps to build strengths to overcome these challenges.

 

Increasing Offender Accountability and Victim Safety in Stalking Cases

Mark Kurkowski

Jennifer Landhuis

Stalking is a complex crime that is often overlooked and underreported. It is a full course of conduct- often including noncriminal behavior-that when viewed as a whole, constitutes the crime of stalking. Early identification of stalking behaviors increases the level of accountability for offenders. The use of threat assessment tools can help assess the level of danger in stalking cases, and the use of victim-centered approaches is essential in working with stalking victims. This interactive session will provide practical tools for those working with offenders and victims that will increase both offender accountability and victim safety.

 

An Innovative Youth Violence Prevention and Intervention Program: Overview, Curriculum, and Evaluation

Jessica Mischkot

Lola Martin 

The epidemic of violence in so many of our communities cannot be overcome unless youth receive prevention services and have easy access to safe places to get help. Margaret’s Place, a program reaching kids in nine schools and two community centers in New York and New Jersey, offers focused and diverse services to increase safety for youth and educate them to help interrupt the cycle of violence. Counselors teach kids how to serve as peer leaders and anti-violence ambassadors in their communities. After three years of extensive evaluation, Margaret’s Place is proving to be a program that works. This workshop will present an overview of the Margaret’s Place program (including our new YES—Youth Empowered to Speak—program), how it developed, its outcomes, and how it is evaluated.  Presenters will also share footage of our program founder Joe Torre, as well as youth program participants.

 

The Misunderstood Victim: Assisting Those with an Acquired Brain Injury

Nils Rosenbaum, M.D.

Matthew Tinney

People living with an Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) are more susceptible to victimization than the average individual and often have difficulty with processing information. Without proper intervention, people with ABI can be further traumatized by those trying to help and may react in unexpected ways.

This session will cover how to identify, understand, and assist victims who have suffered an ABI. A person living with an ABI will take part in the presentation.

 

Responding to Foreign Child Victims of Human Trafficking

Kathryn Naomi Taylor

In this workshop, participants—as potential first responders to child victims of trafficking—will learn how to recognize indicators of human trafficking; the benefits, services, and placements available to foreign child victims of trafficking; and how to request determination of eligibility for these benefits and services. Participants will also learn how they can contribute to developing a child trafficking response protocol within anti-trafficking task forces and coalitions in their own community. 

 

Community Policing and Drug Endangered Children

Jade Woodard

Nazmia Alqadi, Karne Goldsberry

Most identifcations of children exposed to drug-related violence occur because the children were present at the time of drug-related arrests. Other children exposed to violence and drugs who happen to be at school, visiting a relative, or otherwise engaged at the time of arrest are often not identified or tracked. These children continue to live with violence, physical abuse, sexual abuse, domestic trafficking, even commercial sexual explotation, and do not receive the services to protect them from drug-endangered settings and the dysfunction that accompanies such settings. This workshop will introduce the Colorado Alliance for Drug Endangered Children, part of a national movement to promote the health, safety, and well-being of drug endangered children (DEC). Presenters will explore the challenges faced by DEC and the DEC Movement  and review how the Drug Endangered Children Tracking System (DECSYS) program in Colorado helps drug endangered children by fostering better communication between law enforcement and social services when a child is at risk. This communication allows children to be identified earlier and to start receiving services, if warranted. The session will also describe how community policing and the U.S. Department of Justice Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) serve as a resource for the DEC and DECSYS approaches.

 

Ensuring Program Access and Physical Accessibility in Courthouses for Victims of Crime with Disabilities

Jason Johnson

Vickie Simpson

Crime victims with disabilities face unique challenges in obtaining program and physical access in courthouses. This session will review a court’s legal obligations (e.g., related to accommodations, service animals, auxiliary aids, and services) to crime victims with disabilities under the Americans with Disabilities Act. The presentation will address proper etiquette for interacting with individuals with disabilities. In addition, the session will cover physical access requirements in courthouses and potential solutions for common problems. Presenters will also introduce the Illinois’ court disability coordinator program and discuss how participants can replicate the program in their jurisdictions.

 

 

 

How and Why to Protect Young Athletes from Sexual Abuse, Bullying and Harassment

Katherine Starr

This presentation will educate people on the importance and need to have policies and procedures in place in the youth sports environment. How one goes about implementing them, and what resources are available to help a sports environment deal with a problem before it arises.

 

Assessing and Addressing Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking in a Local Context 
Kendra Penry
Responding to and rehabilitating victims of the crime of domestic minor sex trafficking requires that concerned individuals first identify the issue from the perspective of where they live and learn how to motivate their entire community to respond. DMST is a crime that affects children and youth in every community across the US. With 200,000 to 300,000 youth at-risk for this type of exploitation every year, it is of paramount importance that all communities create an informed and effective response, but that is only possible when the reality of the situation is understood in the context of the specific location. This workshop will review the recent field assessment conducted in Houston, Texas that serves as an example of one tool communities can use to begin this process. The session will review the research and interview process used and how participants can implement the same process in their own communities.
 

Sharing Space: Officer/Advocate Strategies for Supporting Victims in High-Risk Domestic Violence Situations

Crystal Tenly

Tami Shafer

This presentation will highlight the Multnomah County Domestic Violence Enhanced Response Team (DVERT) Project, a nationally recognized model of intervention that emphasizes a multidisciplinary response to high lethality and high-risk domestic violence cases. The model is based on best practices that promote holding offenders accountable and increasing victim safety. This presentation will describe how the Multnomah County DVERT Project creates a co-located team and how the partners effectively coordinate their efforts in high-lethality domestic violence cases. Participants will gain new ideas and tools to help their respective jurisdictions to improve their coordinated response to violence. The workshop will include strategies for co-locating advocates with law enforcement, tools to access risk and lethality in domestic violence cases, and ways for victims and the larger community to benefit from a coordinated, multidisciplinary response.

 

Using Social Influence to Combat Investment Fraud

Christine Kieffer

Investment fraud affects thousands of Americans and accounts for billions of dollars in lost personal savings every year.  This workshop will include a review investment fraud research trends and a discussion of a victim profile that shattered stereotypes about typical investment fraud victims (?) and forced regulators to rethink how best to equip investors with the tools they need to thwart fraudsters touting investment scams. We will discuss how an investment fraudster’s pitch and use of persuasion can confuse even the savviest investor. . Finally, we will preview a variety of free resources available for teaching consumers to recognize the red flags, as well as how to report and refer tips and cases to regulators.

 

 

Oklahoma’s State-Tribal Crime Victim Liaison Initiative

Brian Hendrix

This workshop will explore Oklahoma’s State Tribal Crime Victim Liaison Initiative, funded by a l grant from the Department of Justice, Office for Victims of Crime. The project, the only one of its type in the nation, is a demonstration program dedicated to improving communication among tribal, state, federal, and local officials to enhance victim assistance and outreach services to Tribal communities in Oklahoma. The project’s purpose is to enhance crime victim compensation and assistance outreach to Oklahoma’s 38 federally recognized tribes. This workshop will review Oklahoma’s unique history with the 38 Tribal governments that are now headquartered in the state, the historical traumas that the Native people survived, and the ongoing outreach efforts to each Tribal community as described in the grant.

 

 

The Role of Child Abuse Pediatricians in Cases of Child Abuse and Neglect

Allison Jackson, M.D., M.P.H., F.A.A.P.

Child Abuse Pediatrics, though practiced for many decades, is a fairly new subspecialty of pediatric medicine.  This workshop will use case examples to describe the child abuse pediatrician’s approach to the evaluation and management of patients, and will illustrate how child abuse pediatricians work in multidisciplinary teams to achieve the best possible outcomes for victims of child abuse.

 

The Power of Partnerships: A Collaborative Response to Meet the Needs of Older Victims of Abuse

Risa Breckman, LCSW

Veronica LoFaso, M.D.

Given the complexity of abuse in later life, collaboration among victim service organizations, health care, and other professionals is crucial. This workshop will focus on: 1) presenting the effective and highly collaborative model used by the NYC Elder Abuse Center to address the needs of older victims and professionals responding to them; and 2) exploring ways other communities can collaborate to respond to the needs of older victims.  We will show a DVD of an elder abuse victim and her family talking directly about their victimization experience and will use a DVD and case studies to depict our Brooklyn and Manhattan multidisciplinary teams’ responses to the needs of elder abuse victims.

 

Elder Abuse Common, Lethal and Expensive

Kathleen Quinn

Abuse, neglect, and financial exploitation of older persons are far more common, deadly, and expensive than previously known.  This workshop will present the most recent research on the prevalence, lethality, and costs of elder abuse, as well as the indicators of each type of abuse. It will also describe the role of Adult Protective Services (APS), the victim services system that responds to elder abuse and abuse of younger adults with disabilities, which is also rampant, but far less researched than elder abuse.  Participants will receive information on how to “recognize, report and respond” to elder and vulnerable adult abuse, and information on the likelihood of there being mandated reporters.

 

Challenging Perceptions: Military Responses to Domestic and Sexual Violence

Heather Fiedler

There are many myths surrounding the topic of domestic and sexual violence in the military. A commonly held perception is that domestic violence in the military far exceeds that of the civilian rates of domestic abuse. Another commonly held perception is that the military cultivated an attitude of acceptance of Family violence. This session will examine the perceptions of the military and the eligibility criteria for reporting domestic abuse and sexual assault; the methods of intervention available to those who serve; and the differences and similarities among the military and civilian agencies that respond to allegations of abuse.

 

More DNA Testing, With Less Taxpayer Funding
Chris Asplen
The use of "Local DNA databases," absent a connection to the national CODIS DNA database is a growing trend in the US. Cumbersome entry restrictions and slow turnaround times have encouraged many police chiefs to find alternative ways to maximize the power of DNA technology. Bensalem Township, Pennsylvania has allocated monies from its drug forfeiture fund to create a DNA database of local offenders, committing local property and narcotics crimes.  By leveraging quick turnaround time and local databasing, Bensalem has not only solved significantly more cases than through the State and National CODIS system, but have also generated more drug forfeiture funds which can be applied to even more DNA testing. 
 
Strategic Fundraising-- Models that Work
Beth Grupp
This workshop will present a strategic approach to fundraising and will cover such basics as finding new donors for your organization, sharpening your fundraising message, and the do’s and don’ts of a good fundraising ask.  In addition, we will try to do real-time problem solving so come with your questions and concerns. This session is appropriate for those who have never done fundraising as well as those who want to sharpen their skills. We will especially welcome those who really dislike fundraising but find they have to do it anyway!  
 
Collaborating and Training Across the Spectrum:  To  Effectively Respond to Crimes Committed Against Persons with Disabilities Using a Multidisciplinary Approach
Nancy A. Alterio, Marilyn Hammond, Ph.D.
Learn how to develop a multidisciplinary response to abuse and crimes committed against persons with disabilities to ensure an effective response and equal access to the criminal justice system through the work of two-statewide collaborative projects; Massachusetts and Utah.  The presentation will begin with an interactive and enlightening team exercise to reinforce the need to work collaboratively to address crimes committed against persons with disabilities.  Through further examination and discussion of the Massachusetts multidisciplinary team, participants will acquire the necessary understanding and tools for creating and sustaining their own collaboration.   The presentation for Utah will highlight the creation of their multidisciplinary team projects, describe training for law enforcement on responding to victims with disabilities, empowerment training for people with developmental disabilities, and training for care providers, along with recommended practices and resources for other states.
 
Preparing Children for the Legal Process in Sexual Assault and Family Violence Cases: Strategies for Success
Roger Canaff
This presentation will provide insight into the challenges multidisciplinary teams (MDT’s) face in child abuse and family violence legal cases where children are involved as victims and witnesses.  It will also provide strategies and suggestions for MDTs in order to help children be a part of the legal process without being re-victimized by it.  The workshop will stress overall that the welfare of the child victim or witness is paramount in any legal process. But it will demonstrate that, with preparation, skill, compassion and patience, children can be their own best legal advocates, and that the needs of the child and the needs of the case can almost always be in harmony.  Most importantly, participants will receive concrete, practical tips and strategies that will help to prepare children for the legal process such as court tours to reduce anxiety, legal motions to ensure a “child-fair” trial process, and collaboration within the MDT to monitor and consistently ensure that the best interests of the child are met while at the same time seeking the most just and favorable outcome for all involved.